Best Performance Management Practices to Drive Engagement

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According to Gallup, disengaged employees cost American businesses a whopping $450 - 550 billion each year in lost productivity. Workforce engagement is supported by effective management styles that create a culture of accountability and allow each individual employee to thrive within the business.

 

Highly intentional employee performance management is key to driving workforce engagement. Support this style by applying three strategies that are backed by social science research. The strategies are setting clear expectations, goals and key objectives, and providing frequent feedback.

 

Integrating these techniques will keep employees engaged and on track within the business, as well as highlight the main players in the performance management process.

 

Where Employee Engagement and Performance Management Meet

 

Businesses with a high percentage of engaged employees consistently outperform those who don’t. Engaged employees increase productivity, improve customer relations and profitability of the business, and are less likely to quit. The benefits of employee engagement are clear. What is not so clear is how leaders can improve engagement through performance management.

 

Gallup asserts that, for millennials at least, engagement is intrinsically linked to opportunities to learn and grow professionally and personally. J. Lee Whittington’s book, ‘Enhancing Employee Engagement,’ shows how effective, intentional employee performance management empowers leaders to provide opportunities for employees to further develop their skills and learn new things. This leads to workers becoming increasingly engaged with the business.

 

Out with the Old and in With the New

 

Annual performance reviews linked to forced ranking systems and top-down feedback structures have had their day.

 

These old structures are being replaced by effective strategies based on years of research and a better understanding of employee behaviors. This has created the effective performance management programs used by the successful businesses of today.

 

J.Lee Whittington, professor of management at the University of Dallas, along with other HR scholars, is recognizing the importance of directed, goal-oriented performance management programs for employee engagement. These experts assert that three strategies should be used by companies to increase workforce engagement and job satisfaction.

 

1.   Clarify Expectations: It is important that each employee understands exactly what is expected of them. This should be made clear from the very first day an employee starts work, and continue on through the entirety of the employee’s relationship with the business.

 

Role descriptions should be reviewed and responsibilities need to be made clear. Reporting lines, evaluation standards, and acclimatization to organizational culture and values should take place at the very beginning, with periodic refreshers throughout the employee lifecycle.

 

As many as 50% of employees are unclear about what their employers expect from them. This gives clear room for improvement.

 

2.   Key Objectives: The positive impact of goal setting on employee engagement is not a new revelation. Leaving clear, specific, and challenging goals and key objectives helps employees prioritize their work and support overarching business goals.

 

To make the most of this, goals and key objectives should be set with the employee and have a clear connection to the aims of the business. Doing so allows workers to clearly see how their efforts contribute to overall company success. Staff who can easily do this are 3.5 times more likely to be engaged with the business and feel a sense of collective purpose and connection with colleagues.

 

3.   Regular Feedback: End of year performance reviews are simply not enough to help employees feel a strong connection with the business. Goal related feedback should be provided regularly, and key objectives and goals need to be updated as the business’ aims progress. Additionally, they should reflect the role expectations that were clarified at the beginning of an employees’ tenure.

 

While there are a number of different employee feedback mechanisms, research tells us that weekly one-on-one meetings with a direct manager give the highest levels of employee engagement to an organization. These meetings should provide an open space for managers and employees to reassess goals and give constructive feedback. This also provides an time to recognize a job well done and discuss opportunities for continued growth and development.

 

Effective employee performance management systems require active support from a number of stakeholders in an organization.

 

HR teams can help source performance management software that make clarifying role responsibilities, goal setting, and feedback systems easier. Line managers must be dedicated to continued and consistent involvement with their teams through employee performance management, setting objectives, and a committing to individual growth and development.

 

CEO’s must support the development of these strategies through effective communication and strong partnerships with HR, managers, and organizational leaders. In doing so, employees at all levels of an organization will thrive with the business.

 

Best Performance Management Practices to Drive Engagement

 

According to Gallup, disengaged employees cost American businesses a whopping $450 - 550 billion each year in lost productivity. Workforce engagement is supported by effective management styles that create a culture of accountability and allow each individual employee to thrive within the business.

 

Highly intentional employee performance management is key to driving workforce engagement. Support this style by applying three strategies that are backed by social science research. The strategies are setting clear expectations, goals and key objectives, and providing frequent feedback.

 

Integrating these techniques will keep employees engaged and on track within the business, as well as highlight the main players in the performance management process.

 

Where Employee Engagement and Performance Management Meet

 

Businesses with a high percentage of engaged employees consistently outperform those who don’t. Engaged employees increase productivity, improve customer relations and profitability of the business, and are less likely to quit. The benefits of employee engagement are clear. What is not so clear is how leaders can improve engagement through performance management.

 

Gallup asserts that, for millennials at least, engagement is intrinsically linked to opportunities to learn and grow professionally and personally. J. Lee Whittington’s book, ‘Enhancing Employee Engagement,’ shows how effective, intentional employee performance management empowers leaders to provide opportunities for employees to further develop their skills and learn new things. This leads to workers becoming increasingly engaged with the business.

 

Out with the Old and in With the New

 

Annual performance reviews linked to forced ranking systems and top-down feedback structures have had their day.

 

These old structures are being replaced by effective strategies based on years of research and a better understanding of employee behaviors. This has created the effective performance management programs used by the successful businesses of today.

 

J.Lee Whittington, professor of management at the University of Dallas, along with other HR scholars, is recognizing the importance of directed, goal-oriented performance management programs for employee engagement. These experts assert that three strategies should be used by companies to increase workforce engagement and job satisfaction.

 

1.   Clarify Expectations: It is important that each employee understands exactly what is expected of them. This should be made clear from the very first day an employee starts work, and continue on through the entirety of the employee’s relationship with the business.

 

Role descriptions should be reviewed and responsibilities need to be made clear. Reporting lines, evaluation standards, and acclimatization to organizational culture and values should take place at the very beginning, with periodic refreshers throughout the employee lifecycle.

 

As many as 50% of employees are unclear about what their employers expect from them. This gives clear room for improvement.

 

2.   Key Objectives: The positive impact of goal setting on employee engagement is not a new revelation. Leaving clear, specific, and challenging goals and key objectives helps employees prioritize their work and support overarching business goals.

 

To make the most of this, goals and key objectives should be set with the employee and have a clear connection to the aims of the business. Doing so allows workers to clearly see how their efforts contribute to overall company success. Staff who can easily do this are 3.5 times more likely to be engaged with the business and feel a sense of collective purpose and connection with colleagues.

 

3.   Regular Feedback: End of year performance reviews are simply not enough to help employees feel a strong connection with the business. Goal related feedback should be provided regularly, and key objectives and goals need to be updated as the business’ aims progress. Additionally, they should reflect the role expectations that were clarified at the beginning of an employees’ tenure.

 

While there are a number of different employee feedback mechanisms, research tells us that weekly one-on-one meetings with a direct manager give the highest levels of employee engagement to an organization. These meetings should provide an open space for managers and employees to reassess goals and give constructive feedback. This also provides an time to recognize a job well done and discuss opportunities for continued growth and development.

 

Effective employee performance management systems require active support from a number of stakeholders in an organization.

 

HR teams can help source performance management software that make clarifying role responsibilities, goal setting, and feedback systems easier. Line managers must be dedicated to continued and consistent involvement with their teams through employee performance management, setting objectives, and a committing to individual growth and development.

 

CEO’s must support the development of these strategies through effective communication and strong partnerships with HR, managers, and organizational leaders. In doing so, employees at all levels of an organization will thrive with the business.

Sam RiehnComment